The aim of this blog is to connect fly-tyers all over the world, to share, techniques, patterns, information and knowledge.

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Sea Bass herring

Heres another one of the old video tutorials while I edit the new ones!

Sea trout flies now available!!

In connection with the launch of my new sea trout patterns book 25 of the patterns featured are now available exclusively from ‘Skitt Fiske’ on the following link.

http://www.skittfiske.no/Avdelinger/FISKEUTSTYR/Fluer/Sjøørret-/havabborfluer/Barry-Ord-Clarke-Series

 

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Show list for tying demos 2015

Show list for tying demos 2015

Fluebinderens-bibel-2-omslag-v1.7 copy

Here is the list of confirmed shows so far that I will be tying at in 2015. If you are attending any of these shows and you would like to order books or flies please let me know in advance via e mail so that I can bring them along. There are also several other shows that the dates are not yet confirmed so I will be adding these as and when I receive confirmation.

If you would like me to hold a tying course, demo, or attend a show please e mail me for availability and details.

barrycl@online.no

I hope to see you there!
Saturday 7 and Sunday 8 February: British Fly Fair International
http://www.bffi.co.uk
Saturday 21 and Sunday 22 February St Etienne: Salon International da la Mouche
http://www.sanama.fr

Saturday 28 February and Sunday 1 March NJFF Jakt og Fiskesenter: Fly tying weekend
http://www.njff.no/Sider/meldpa.aspx?kak_id=0da5caf4-116c-e411-80da-000c29901a84

Saturday 7 and Sunday 8 March Glasgow Angling Centre: Open weekend
http://www.fishingmegastore.com/index.html
Friday 20, Saturday 21 and Sunday 22 March Swedish Sportfiskemessan: Swedish sport fishing show
http://www.sportfiskemassan.se/Aktuellt/Flugbindartorget/Barry-Ord-Clarke

Saturday 18 and Sunday 19 April EWF Munich Germany: European fly fishing show.
http://www.erlebniswelt-fliegenfischen.de

Fluebinderens bibel II Sjøørretfluer

Fluebinderens-bibel-2-omslag-v1.7 copy

The new book ‘Flies for Salt water sea trout’ contains over 50 patterns step by step. Currently only available in Norwegian will be out in March 2015 you can order it at post@vegaforlag.no

Sad news

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I am very sad to learn that my good friend and world class fly tyer Chris Helm passed away yesterday.
Chris had been battling Cancer for some time. He will be sadley missed but always fondley remembered… My thoughts are with his family and close friends.

 

Fly tying course # 11 The Humpy

Originally posted on thefeatherbender:

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This popular western pattern comes in many variants of colour, wing and tail materials, hackle and single and double hump.  The Humpy is also tied in two styles, short and fat and the long and slim version I am tying here.  Although made to imitate nothing in particular, except a juicy mouth full, this has a reputation of being a difficult fly to tie, but as I have mentioned in earlier step by step posts, follow the procedures and proportions and you will soon be banging them out by the dozen. 

Hook: Mustad R50 # 10-16

Tying Thread: Dyneema

Tail: Natural deer hair

Body: Floss

Shell back: Deer hair

Hackle: Furnace cock

Wings: Deer hair

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SEcure your hook in the vice making sure the hook shank is horizontal.

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Attach your tying thread and run the full length of the hook shank, stopping at the bend.

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Take a…

View original 732 more words

Fly tying course # 10 Muddler Minnow

 

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Unquestionably the most famous of all streamers, and the model for many others.

 

Hook: Mustad R73NP-BR # 10-4

Thread: Dyneema (waxed)

Tail: Mottled turkey

Body: Flat gold tinsel

Rib: Copper wire

Underwing: Grey squirrel tail

Wing: Mottled turkey

Collar/Head: Spun and clipped natural deer hair

 

A few notes regarding the original Muddler pattern:

 

The hook used by its originator Don Gapen was a Mustad 38941 3X Long streamer, this was one of the long flies. When tying slip wings its important to use waxed thread. The Dyneema I use in most my patterns is too smooth for for wet fly style wings and has to be waxed in order not to slip. 

The original recipe is as above but excluding the copper wire rib. The rib is a later addition. The original was tied with metal tinsel that required no protection from the small sharp teeth of trout but later as plastic tinsel became the norm the wire rib was added to protect the tinsel and add additional strength.  When spinning large bunches of deer hair I recommend, if you are using regular tying thread a minimum denier of 3/0 waxed is necessary to have sufficient  strength to apply enough tension to achieve optimal flare in the deer hair.  When tying spun and clipped deer hair patterns your choice of hair is paramount. See my earlier posts regarding tying with deer hair and spinning deer hair.

If I was unfortunate enough to be be given the choice of having only one fly to fish for all species both in fresh and salt water, I would have no problem! The Muddler minnow would without doubt be my number one choice. The pattern I tie here is as close to the original as I can get.

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 1
Secure your 3XL streamer hook in the vice making sure that the hook shank is horizontal.
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2
You will need two mottled turkey feathers one from each wing. Cut two small slips one from the same position from each wing feather for the tail.
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Attach your tying thread and run it the full length of the hook shank so that it hangs vertically between the hook point and barb. Place the two small wing slips ‘back to back and tie in on top of the hook shank for the tail as shown. This is done by holding the two slips in the left hand while you make one loose turn of tying thread around the slips and between your finger and thumb. Tighten by pulling your tying thread ‘upwards’ This will stop your wing slips from slipping around the hook and keep them central and straight.
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4
Trim off the surplus slip butts diagonally and tie in a length of fine copper wire at the base of the tail. Now cover the hook shank with an even coat of tying thread. This is important to get a tinsel body of the same thickness.
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Tie in your flat tinsel about 1 cm behind the hook eye. Wind the tinsel in even close fitting turns all the way back to the tail and the back to the tying in position behind the hook eye. Tie off.
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Cut off the excess flat tinsel and then wrap the copper wire rib in the opposite direction to the flat tinsel, in even open turns. Tie off.
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Cut a medium bunch of hair from a grey squirrel tail and remove the under fur and shorter hairs. Stack the hair in a hair stacker. Now measure the hair wing along the hook shank so that it is the same length as the slip tail. Trim the hair wing to length. Now before you tie the hair in place a small drop of varnish on the cut end of the hair bunch, this will glue it in place and also make it more durable. Tie in on top of the hook shank.
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Cut two larger mottled turkey wing slips for the wing. Again one from each wing feather.
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Tie these in the same way as the tail on top of the squirrel tail underwing.
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Select some good dense natural deer hair from the winter coat. See my earlier post on European Roe deer.
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Cut a good generous bunch. This is where many tyers make the mistake of too small a bunch and having to add more bunches later, to make the whole head. The head should be made of only one bunch of deer hair. Clean the hair by removing the under fur and shorter hairs and stack in a hair stacker.
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Place the bunch of deer hair with the tips facing back towards the tail, these will be the collar of the head. While holding the bunch in place make two loose turns of tying thread around the bunch, then tighten by by pulling upwards and the hair will flare. Once the hair is flared make several other tight wraps with a ‘zig zag’ movement as you go towards the hook eye. This will push the deer hair from side to side as you wrap and stop you from trapping the hair and tying it down flat!
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Tie off and whip finish. You can now begin to trim your muddler head to the basic shape. See my deer hair tutorial.
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14
You can choose here if you would like a cone shaped head. You can see on this image that some hair ends are burnt! see my deer hair tutorial for the full step be step of this technique.
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Or a round clipped head. This style will move more water when stripped.
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The finished Muddler minnow.

Fly tying course # 9 Techniques for traditional dry’s

Originally posted on thefeatherbender:

Techniques for traditional dry’s

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Its often said “If you can tie a good dry fly, you can tie just about anything” this makes dry flies sound extremely difficult, they are not. There are many other patterns that look much simpler but are much more challenging for the tyer to master. 

The key to good dry flies:  

Quality materials

Proportion

Attention to detail

Follow the step by step instructions

Practice

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Follow these rules and you will be tying great dry flies in no time.

Although you dont need perfect, great looking flies to catch fish, a well proportioned dry fly will float better and fish better in many cases giving a much more correct footprint on the water. There is also the wow factor, a well tied box of flies is always a great talking point amongst friends and other fishermen!

The techniques shown here are normally only learned after…

View original 710 more words

Fly tying course # 8 The Brassie

Originally posted on thefeatherbender:

The BrassieIMG_0695

Hook:  Mustad C49SNP # 6-22  http://www.mustad.no/productcatalog/product.php?id=177

Tying thread:  Dyneema

Body:  Copper wire

Head:  Mixed hares ear dubbing

Its normal to weight nymphs with and under body of lead, but on small flies its sometimes desirable  to maintain a slim but at the same time heavy, body profile. With the Brassie copper wire of different sizes is used in respect to hook size, but you can achieve the best results with copper wire that is no thicker than the hook wire being used.  Copper wire in different colours can give extremely natural looking abdomen on pupa and larva patterns. Copper wire gives the impression of gas bubbles that hatching pupa and larva carry with them to the surface. The Brassie is especially effective in fast flowing water as a free swimming caddis larva or in smaller sizes as a midge pupa in still water.

In those situations where…

View original 361 more words

Bug Bond Thunder Creek.

barryoc:

Heres another bullet head pattern for fly tying course # 7

Originally posted on thefeatherbender:

Bug Bond Thunder Creek, a great salt water sea trout pattern.

The original Thunder creek streamer series came from the vice of American, Keith Fulsher. In the early sixties, not satisfied with the regular head and eye size of streamers, he began experimenting and chose the reverse buck tail technique for his Thunder creek patterns.  This technique involves tying the buck tail, as the technique suggests, the opposite way and then folding it back over the hook shank and tying down to form the head. The simplicity of this pattern and the minimal materials needed to tie it, is fly design at its very best! He achieved his goal, a slim two toned body with a large minnow head that allowed for larger eyes, the main attack point for predatory fish and through changing only the buck tail colour and hook size, could imitate numerous baitfish. Streamers generally fall into…

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