The aim of this blog is to connect fly-tyers all over the world, to share, techniques, patterns, information and knowledge.

Sea trout Flat wing

Firstly may I wish you all a happy new year!

The seasonal festivities family birthdays and goodbye ceremonies are now over and I have more time to get back to what is most important. Thats right, fishing and fly tying! So please accept my apologies for being vacant the last couple of weeks, but now I am back in the saddle with the first sea trout fly of the year. Please enjoy and much more will come soon.

Yours,

The Feather Bender.

This sea trout flat wing variant is a sure winner and an attractor of larger fish.

This sea trout flat wing variant is a sure winner and an attractor of larger fish.

The original flat wing pattern was developed by the late Bill Peabody a well known fly tyer and fisherman from Rhode Island in the US.  The original pattern was developed for stripped bass but was also found to be just as successful on many other salt water species. Recently a number of flat wing patterns have been developed for salt water sea trout and sea bass fishing in Northern Europe and have proved to be extremely effective.

One of the great things about tying these modern flat wing patterns is that the design lends itself extremely well to individual interpretation in size, colour and material use. But remember that the key word for tying flat wings is sparse, if you over dress these flies you defeat the whole point with them. Try and use materials that are light but create volume, but always consider the movement of the material in the water when fished and don´t forget its reflective and  flash qualities. Some fly tiers also make use of a tandem hook on larger patterns, attached by mean´s of a wire or mono extension with the tail hook, up side down. But I find that this in most cases completely changes the action of the fly.

Hook Mustad S71SNP-ZS # 8-2 http://www.mustad.no/productcatalog/product.php?id=193

Tying thread Dyneema

Tail Two flat wing saddle hackles and Flashabou

Body Mother of pearl Body Braid coated with Bug Bond

Under wing White buck tail and five strands of Crystal flash

Over wing Yellow Olive and blue buck tail mixed

Topping Five strands of fine peacock herl

Throat White buck tail

Cheeks Jungle cock

1. Secure your salt water hook in the vice and attach your tying thread at the rear.

1. Secure your salt water hook in the vice and attach your tying thread at the rear.

2. tie in two medium long saddle hackles flat on top of the hook shank as shown along with a few strands of flashabou or similar

2. Tie in two medium long saddle hackles flat on top of the hook shank as shown along with a few strands of flashabou or similar.

3. Cut a length of MOP Bills body braid at the base of the flat wing tail.

3. Cut a length of MOP Bills body braid at the base of the flat wing tail.

4. Wrap the body braid over the whole hook shank taking care to leave enough space for the wing and head.

4. Wrap the body braid over the whole hook shank taking care to leave enough space for the wing and head.

5. tie in a bunch of white buck tail and a few strands of crystal hair for the wing.

5. tie in a bunch of white buck tail and a few strands of crystal hair for the wing.

6. Mix a small bunch of buck tail in your chosen colours and even in a hair stacker.

6. Mix a small bunch of buck tail in your chosen colours and even in a hair stacker.

7. Tie in this bunch on top of the white under wing.

7. Tie in this bunch on top of the white under wing.

8. Tie in another smaller bunch of white buck tail for the throat of the fly.

8. Tie in another smaller bunch of white buck tail for the throat of the fly.

9. Top off the wing with four or five strands of peacock herl.

9. Top off the wing with four or five strands of peacock herl.

11. Using a dubbing needle or similar make the peacock herl curve in the right way.

11. Using a dubbing needle or similar make the peacock herl curve in the right way.

12. Select two jungle cock eyes and tie in one each side of the wing base.

12. Select two jungle cock eyes and tie in one each side of the wing base.

13. Whip finish. Colour the head of the fly with a waterproof felt pen and varnish.

13. Whip finish. Colour the head of the fly with a waterproof felt pen and varnish.

Once the flat wing has become wet you will understand how the wing and tail fall naturally into place to form a fantastic mobile bait fish imitation.

Once the flat wing has become wet you will understand how the wing and tail fall naturally into place to form a fantastic mobile bait fish imitation.

6 responses

  1. I like it. I think on my version I’d use a full collar, EP anadromus brush perhaps.

    January 9, 2013 at 8:34 pm

    • Hi Kenneth, thanks, I haven’t tried any with a full collar, so i’ll give it a go. It has to be somthing very soft though so it all folds back when wet!

      January 10, 2013 at 8:45 am

  2. Jan

    Hi Barry,

    a nice fly, thanks for it. I’ll try to tie some for my trip to southern Sweden next week. Are you also tying weighted versions of it?

    Cheers

    Jan

    March 18, 2014 at 10:29 am

    • Hi Jan,

      No I have never found the need for a weighted version! I have found in the past that the movement of a large fly on a small hook is diminished when weighted. If you are visiting the Svensk sportfiskemessan pop in and say hi.

      Cheers

      Barry

      March 19, 2014 at 8:26 am

  3. I liked your color choices. So I tied one up this morning!

    I wish that I could send you a photo!

    If you tied the fly with a small ball of maribou fluff from the bottom of one of the feathers, just above the bend of the hook you could keep the feathers from splaying. Check out Kenney Abrames books “Striper Moon” and “A Perect Fish”, or Tightlines Videos for Joe Cordiero’s Flatwings. They are both fantastic tyers and fishers. They have taught me a lot!

    January 20, 2016 at 5:53 pm

    • Hi John, Good to hear! You don’t need to stop the feathers from splaying as this will reduce movement and when fished the water will hold everything in place. I’ll check out those books!

      January 20, 2016 at 6:00 pm

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