E-Z Sand Eel

I am currently working with salt water patterns for Northern Europe so I will be publishing a good selection of modern patterns for sea trout and bass in the coming week. Hook Mustad S70SNP-DT Big Game Light # 4-6 http://www.mustad.no/productcatalog/na/product.php?id=191 Thread Dyneema Body E-Z body tube http://www.e-zbody.com/ Tail 15 strands of Flashabou  Eyes Fleye Foils http://www.theflypeople.com/ Head Bug Bond http://www.veniard.com/section188/ The original pattern this is based on is form the vice of my late, old friend Jack Gartside. This is not only an extremely effective pattern but also requires the minimum materials and once you have mastered the technique is very quick to tie. … Continue reading E-Z Sand Eel

Tying shows 2014

NEW DATES: The 2014 fly tying show dates are now being confirmed. If you are not a regular to fly tying shows I can’t recommend them highly enough!  They are a great source for not only materials and tools but also inspiration, with many great tyers from around the world demonstrating their techniques and patterns, so try and take in one of them this spring. Here are my dates for some of the shows. There are several other shows that the dates are not fully confirmed yet and I will publish these when they are up-dated. I look forward to … Continue reading Tying shows 2014

Fly tying course # 21 The virtual Minnow

The original zonker pattern was tied by the American fly tyer Dan Byford in the 1970s and was quickly recognised the world over, as a big fish fly and extremely easy to tie, yet realistic imitation for most smaller bait fish. The original pattern used a lead or tin sheet that was folded and glued over the hook shank and then cut to shape to make the underbody.   This melt glue body technique gives the zonker a new life. If viewed by a fish in reflected light the shine and flashing of the maylar mixed with the animation of … Continue reading Fly tying course # 21 The virtual Minnow

Fly Tying Course # 19 The G & H Sedge

The G & H Sedge or Goddard Caddis The G & H sedge, as it was originally named was created by John Goddard and Cliff Henry.  John Goddard who died last December was one of the great innovators of fly tying. This is a small tribute to one of, if not, his most famous patterns. The dressing and style of tying I demonstrate here, is taken from the 1977 re-print of his 1969  book ‘Trout flies of still-water’.   Original recipe Hook:  Long-shank 8-10 Tying Silk: Green Underbody: Dark green seals fur Body: Natural deer hair  Hackle: Two rusty dun … Continue reading Fly Tying Course # 19 The G & H Sedge

Fly Tying course # 18 Flying Mutantz

Flying Mutantz After much response regarding my Mutantz pattern I published last year, here is the new and improved Flying Mutant that has fished extremely well for me this year, with a few new techniques that can be applied to other patterns.    On the warmest summer days the temperature rises in the south facing ant hills and triggers the annual swarming.  Ants are not good flyers, so they leave the nest in large numbers to increase the chances of establishing a new colony. When they take to the wing they are at the mercy of the wind and end … Continue reading Fly Tying course # 18 Flying Mutantz

Fly Tying Course # 17 Chernobyl Ant

  This pattern was the product of Rainey Riding’s imagination after the Chernobyl atomic plant accident. Resembling an ant, only in the weirdest imagination, this is a great stimulator pattern. The CCFS (closed cell foam sheet) used in this ant floats like a cork, and the 8 rubber legs dance a jitter bug across the surface of the water. I first encountered the Chernobyl ant many years ago, while visiting a fly fishing shop in Toronto Canada, called Skinners. I enquired about good patterns for Brook trout in the north, they said that I would only need one fly, the … Continue reading Fly Tying Course # 17 Chernobyl Ant

Fly tying course # 14 The ribbon shrimp

Sorry for taking so long for my next installment for the tying course but I am very busy right now photographing sea trout fishing as the season is underway.  This is a simple but extremely realistic salt water shrimp pattern I designed for salt water sea trout fishing in Northern Europe. Ribbon Shrimp Hook Mustad Shrimp C47SNP-DT http://www.mustad.no/productcatalog/na/product.php?id=189 Eyes: Easy shrimp eyes http://www.easyshrimpeyes.dk/ Feelers/Body: Organdie decretive ribbon  If you’re looking for pre-dyed “organdie” it’s available in the UK from http://www.ribbonoasis.co.uk  in a good range of colours and widths, just go to the site and search for “organza”, different name same product.  Shell back Bug … Continue reading Fly tying course # 14 The ribbon shrimp

Fly tying course # 12 The Matuka streamer

This is one of my own patterns for sea trout fishing, The Matuka Tobis. All types of hackle can be used for the wings, so experiment. The Matuka style streamer originated from New Zealand and unlike traditional feather wing streamers where the wing is allowed to flow freely, the wing on the Matuka is attached to the body with the rib. The dimensions of this pattern can be played with and adjusted to your own taste. You can use larger hackles and make the tail longer or use hen hackles and make the pattern higher in the wing, you can … Continue reading Fly tying course # 12 The Matuka streamer

Fly tying course # 11 The Humpy

This popular western pattern comes in many variants of colour, wing and tail materials, hackle and single and double hump.  The Humpy is also tied in two styles, short and fat and the long and slim version I am tying here.  Although made to imitate nothing in particular, except a juicy mouth full, this has a reputation of being a difficult fly to tie, but as I have mentioned in earlier step by step posts, follow the procedures and proportions and you will soon be banging them out by the dozen.  Hook: Mustad R50 # 10-16 Tying Thread: Dyneema Tail: … Continue reading Fly tying course # 11 The Humpy

Fly tying course # 9 Techniques for traditional dry’s

Techniques for traditional dry’s Its often said “If you can tie a good dry fly, you can tie just about anything” this makes dry flies sound extremely difficult, they are not. There are many other patterns that look much simpler but are much more challenging for the tyer to master.  The key to good dry flies:   Quality materials Proportion Attention to detail Follow the step by step instructions Practice Follow these rules and you will be tying great dry flies in no time. Although you dont need perfect, great looking flies to catch fish, a well proportioned dry fly … Continue reading Fly tying course # 9 Techniques for traditional dry’s

Fly tying course # 8 The Brassie

The Brassie Hook:  Mustad C49SNP # 6-22  http://www.mustad.no/productcatalog/product.php?id=177 Tying thread:  Dyneema Body:  Copper wire Head:  Mixed hares ear dubbing Its normal to weight nymphs with and under body of lead, but on small flies its sometimes desirable  to maintain a slim but at the same time heavy, body profile. With the Brassie copper wire of different sizes is used in respect to hook size, but you can achieve the best results with copper wire that is no thicker than the hook wire being used.  Copper wire in different colours can give extremely natural looking abdomen on pupa and larva patterns. … Continue reading Fly tying course # 8 The Brassie