Pseudo Spinner

Fishing, or even identifying a mayfly spinner fall can be one of the most challenging situations a fly fisherman can experience! Its all about breaking codes and learning to read the signs. With the larger mayflies its somewhat easier to recognize the spinner fall, danica and vulgata are so large that they can be seen at a greater distance floating in a crucifix posture and lifeless in the surface, sometimes with such a high mortality rate they cover the whole surface of the river. But smaller darker and sometimes almost transparent species can be difficult to see even at close … Continue reading Pseudo Spinner

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Sim Fly festival – Castel di Sangro Italy

Early tomorrow I will be leaving for the SIM fly festival in the small mountain village of Castel di Sangro in Italy. I will be demonstrating tying small deer hair dry flies on the 21st and 22nd, along with some other great tyres at the Italian museum of fly fishing. If you are around its well worth a visit, its a great festival, great town and the Sangro is one great river with some huge trout! Ciao ! Continue reading Sim Fly festival – Castel di Sangro Italy

Elasticaddis in the house!

House building caddis larva are available in most waters all year round, and are an important segment of the diet of trout and grayling.  There are many techniques that have been developed over the years from fly tying benches all over the world to imitate the house of the caddis larva, but this technique really gives the right impression.  This is a pattern I believe was developed in the US, but other than that I cant find any other information about it.  The great thing about this pattern is if you trim the rubber legs close to the body you … Continue reading Elasticaddis in the house!

Klinkhåmer Special

Its been a few days since my last post, so I thought I would get things going again with a truly modern classic, the Klinkhåmer. When I have held fly tying demos and courses for both beginners and advanced tyers there is always some who have questions about tying the Klinkhåmer. So here it is, the correct way, learn and enjoy. Original recipe for the Klinkhåmer: Hook:   Daiichi 1160, Daiichi 1167 Klinkhåmer hooks size 8-20 Thread:            Uni-thread, 8/0, grey or tan for body Spiderweb for parachute Body:    Fly Rite Poly Dubbing any colour of preference or Wapsi Super … Continue reading Klinkhåmer Special

Making a fur hackle and dubbing tutorial

Once again this is a request I have had from several fellow bloggers for the fur hackle spinning technique. Although similar too the spinning deer hair article, there are a few pointers you should be aware of when mastering this technique. Just about all natural and synthetic furs, feathers and hairs can be used as one form of dubbing or another. Before you start its worth considering what type of hair or material is suitable for the type of fly you are tying. There are several factors regarding the choice of natural materials. 1. Dry fly, nymph, wet. 2. Sinking, … Continue reading Making a fur hackle and dubbing tutorial

The Midas touch, confessions of a nymph-omaniac.

The Midas nymph is my rendition on a more common pattern called the copper John, which uses copper wire instead of gold oval tinsel amongst other things. The interesting thing about the copper John, according to Bruce Olsen sales manager for Umpqua Feather Merchants, The worlds largest manufacturer of commercially tied flies, the copper John is the best selling trout fly in the world. “We sell them by the tens of thousands” Bruce says, and thats just the original copper version. When you add in all the colour variant of that pattern, the numbers get to be absolutely staggering.”   … Continue reading The Midas touch, confessions of a nymph-omaniac.