Killer Bug and Chadwick’s 477

Heres another little gem of a pattern that may be one of the most simple flies ever tied! The killer bug tied with the original Chadwick’s 477 reinforcing and mending wool. This classic Grayling pattern from nymph expert and legendary river keeper Frank Sawyer still doesn’t disappoint, but if you follow Sawyer’s tying instruction, the killer or (grayling) bug as it was originally named, could and should only be tied with one brand and shade of wool, Chadwick’s No 477. Although this wool is not produced anymore there are a whole load of substitutes to be found and the original … Continue reading Killer Bug and Chadwick’s 477

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Tying the willow fly

Giving em the Needle One of the late autumns highlights is great hatches of needle flies Leuctra, especially here on the big grayling rivers of mid Norway. Although the hatches begin as early as June and run until November the climax is in august- september. These small stoneflies can be difficult to see on the best of days, especially amongst the autumns fall of floating foliage, and remember they crawl onto land to hatch, so you will always find more on the bank, than on the water. Because they hatch and mate on land its the females that are of … Continue reading Tying the willow fly

The Black Pennell

Black Pennell & Family…   One of the classic ‘Black’ flies that has survived the test of time.  Classified as a fancy wet or loch style pattern the Black Pennell came from the tying bench of Mr H. Cholmondeley Pennell a wealthy Edwardian english gentleman, who loved fishing in Northern Europe. There are several styles in tying this pattern, some with a fine slim body of only one layer of tying thread, the tapered body, as shown here and one with seals fur or black wool. Although some listings say that the hackle should be of a black hen tied … Continue reading The Black Pennell

Large dark olive trio

Large dark olive The large dark olive (Baetis rhodani) are probably the most widespread of all the European may flies, being Multivoltine, where water temperature allows, having two or more generation cycles per year, makes it even more important to the trout and fly fishermen alike! When designing fishing flies its not the very small details that count, although aesthetically pleasing to the fly tyer, and an important part of our craft! its a combination of several that will be the deciding factor for the fish. Size, colour, silhouette, footprint, behavior. One of the earliest hatches here in Norway that … Continue reading Large dark olive trio

Tying Long Flies

Blue Devil Custom This is one of the many patterns from the legendary Rangeley fly tyer Carrie G Stevens. Most of her patterns where tied on 6 X long – 10 X long shank hooks although she did use some that where even 12 X long, these super long shank hooks is what gives these flies their unique profile and silhouette. In 1924 Carrie G Stevens caught a 6lb 13oz brook trout on a prototype streamer she had made herself. She entered her catch into the fishing competition in the well known American magazine “Field and Stream” shortly after her … Continue reading Tying Long Flies

Wooly Bugger tutorial

but as I have mentioned many times before, its all about proportions! Spending time getting this right from the beginning will produce great looking flies only after you have tied a few. I am not saying that scruffy buggers won’t catch fish, quite the opposite, but there is more to fly tying than catching fish! What fly tyer doesn’t want his flies to look great? Continue reading Wooly Bugger tutorial

The Midas touch, confessions of a nymph-omaniac.

The Midas nymph is my rendition on a more common pattern called the copper John, which uses copper wire instead of gold oval tinsel amongst other things. The interesting thing about the copper John, according to Bruce Olsen sales manager for Umpqua Feather Merchants, The worlds largest manufacturer of commercially tied flies, the copper John is the best selling trout fly in the world. “We sell them by the tens of thousands” Bruce says, and thats just the original copper version. When you add in all the colour variant of that pattern, the numbers get to be absolutely staggering.”   … Continue reading The Midas touch, confessions of a nymph-omaniac.

Helter Skelter Pike Fly jig.

Hook Mustad S74SZ # 2/0-4/0 Thread Dyneema Body E-Z Body XL filled with 3-5 beads Under wing White buck tail Wing Chartreuse and white Icelandic sheep Over wing Lime green Big fish fiber Sides Grizzle cock hackles coloured yellow Eyes Large mobile eyes and bug bond or epoxy I developed the Heltor skeltor to maximize all the attractor elements possible in one fly. The Icelandic sheep and big fly fiber are extremely mobile in water, but their effect is enhanced by the weight of the brass beads that roll back and forth in the body tube giving not only a … Continue reading Helter Skelter Pike Fly jig.

Fender Parachute

This is a quick and simple parachute technique that requires only deer hair and Bug Bond. Hook: Mustad C49 Tying thread: Dyneema Body: Moose mane hair Hackle: Roe deer hair and Bug Bond Thorax: Underfur from deer or moose winter coat. 1. Secure your emerger hook in the vice with as much of the bend clear of the jaws. Continue reading Fender Parachute

Deer Hair Immerger.

Presentation is alfa and omega when fishing emergers. This incredibly simple pattern, truly, it only takes a few minutes to tie! makes emergers into immergers. This technique places your pattern right below the surface film (immersed) as if the insect is actually climbing out of the shuck onto the surface. Taking my Fender emerger one step further by extending the deer hair parachute post which places the entire hook, and tippet point entirely under the surface… All you need: Hook: Mustad C49S  http://www.mustad.no/productcatalog/product.php?id=177 Tying Thread: Dyneema Body: Moose hair coated with Bug Bond  for Bug Bond see links: http://www.bug-bond.moonfruit.com/   http://www.veniard.com/section188/ Post: … Continue reading Deer Hair Immerger.