Shove,Shave,Singe and Sand Technique

    My Shove, Shave, Singe and Sand technique for the tightest deer hair bodies. Probably the most frequent question I am asked at shows and demos is how do I get my small deer hair bodies so tight. Well heres my secret in full step by step tuition. This is one of my very early patterns the deer hair pupa that was inspired by a meeting with the late Gary LaFontaine many years ago and his own deep sparkle pupa pattern. The first requirement for tight bodies is the correct deer hair. Although I acquire most of my own … Continue reading Shove,Shave,Singe and Sand Technique

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Stingsild bucktail streamer

  Although the recent tendency for tying and designing sea trout flies has gone more towards imitation patterns, some of which are extremely realistic, I am constantly drawn back to some more traditional styles of tying, that never stop producing fish. This is one of them!  This extremely simple pattern is so effective on autumn sea trout that for the past few years at least a couple of dozen have to be tied for my box.  During the summer months the Mickey Finn, another classic buck-tail streamer, is an outstanding pattern on bright sunny days, but falls short when fished … Continue reading Stingsild bucktail streamer

Klinkhåmer Special

Its been a few days since my last post, so I thought I would get things going again with a truly modern classic, the Klinkhåmer. When I have held fly tying demos and courses for both beginners and advanced tyers there is always some who have questions about tying the Klinkhåmer. So here it is, the correct way, learn and enjoy. Original recipe for the Klinkhåmer: Hook:   Daiichi 1160, Daiichi 1167 Klinkhåmer hooks size 8-20 Thread:            Uni-thread, 8/0, grey or tan for body Spiderweb for parachute Body:    Fly Rite Poly Dubbing any colour of preference or Wapsi Super … Continue reading Klinkhåmer Special

The royal member of the Wulff pack

The Royal Wulff As the name says, the man behind the famous series of patterns was Lee Wulff and the most famous of all is the Wulff that is Royal! The fattest pattern of the Wulff family is just as good fished as a searching pattern as it is as a adult may fly. It just presses all the right buttons, It floats high, its visible even at a great distance in rough water and looks like a mouthful of whatever trout are eating. Although a great pattern, I hardly ever see people tying it! Why is that? It’s a … Continue reading The royal member of the Wulff pack

Bradshaw’s Fancy

Keeping on a grayling theme heres one of my absolute favourites, Not only to fish with but also to tie. All these patterns from bygone days are remarkably simple, but still require a degree of  technique to master them precisely. One of the peculiar characteristics of the grayling is that they have a preference for flies dressed with a hot spot of red in their make-up, probably the most famous is the red tag, but here are a few more, older patterns that still get the job done. Bradshaw’s Fancy Hook: Mustad http://www.mustad.no/productcatalog/na/product.php?id=178 Thread: Veevus Red 12/0 Tag: Red floss silk … Continue reading Bradshaw’s Fancy

Killer Bug and Chadwick’s 477

Heres another little gem of a pattern that may be one of the most simple flies ever tied! The killer bug tied with the original Chadwick’s 477 reinforcing and mending wool. This classic Grayling pattern from nymph expert and legendary river keeper Frank Sawyer still doesn’t disappoint, but if you follow Sawyer’s tying instruction, the killer or (grayling) bug as it was originally named, could and should only be tied with one brand and shade of wool, Chadwick’s No 477. Although this wool is not produced anymore there are a whole load of substitutes to be found and the original … Continue reading Killer Bug and Chadwick’s 477

Tying the willow fly

Giving em the Needle One of the late autumns highlights is great hatches of needle flies Leuctra, especially here on the big grayling rivers of mid Norway. Although the hatches begin as early as June and run until November the climax is in august- september. These small stoneflies can be difficult to see on the best of days, especially amongst the autumns fall of floating foliage, and remember they crawl onto land to hatch, so you will always find more on the bank, than on the water. Because they hatch and mate on land its the females that are of … Continue reading Tying the willow fly