The aim of this blog is to connect fly-tyers all over the world, to share, techniques, patterns, information and knowledge.

Fly tying course # 12 The Matuka streamer

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This is one of my own patterns for sea trout fishing, The Matuka Tobis. All types of hackle can be used for the wings, so experiment.

The Matuka style streamer originated from New Zealand and unlike traditional feather wing streamers where the wing is allowed to flow freely, the wing on the Matuka is attached to the body with the rib. The dimensions of this pattern can be played with and adjusted to your own taste. You can use larger hackles and make the tail longer or use hen hackles and make the pattern higher in the wing, you can combine hackles to create a different colour effect, for example, tie in two large blue hackles as the center of the wing and then two smaller green hackles one each side. The body doesn’t have to be tinsel, but can be made from chenille or any kind of dubbing. So use your imagination and create some tasty Matuka’s.

 

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1

Secure your streamer hook in the vice with the hook shank horizontal.

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2

Run your tying thread all the way back to the hook bend.

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3

Tie in a good length of fine copper wire. It handy to keep this length long so its easier to handle.

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4

If you are tying a tinsel body, its important to keep the under body of tying thread nice and smooth. This can be done by rubbing a small piece of closed cell foam up and down the hook shank to smooth out the tying thread.

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5

Cut a good length of flat tinsel with the cut end at an angle as shown.

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6

Tie this in on the underside of the hook shank where the throat hackle will be placed later. If you are using two sided tinsel as here, the side you dont want as the body (silver) should be tied in facing you as shown.

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7

The tinsel is now ready to wrap.

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8

Wrap the tinsel in tight even turns all the way back to the hook bend, make sure that you cover all the underbody and no tying thread is left showing. Now wrap the tinsel back towards the hook eye and tie off as neatly as possible. 

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9

Select two hackles of your choice. These should be the same size.

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10

Place the hackles back to back and measure the wing against the hook shank to the correct length.

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11

Strip off the two matching sides as shown of the hackles to the correct length. This should be done as precisely as possible.

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12

Check they are correct and adjust them if necessary.

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13

Before you tie them in you can flatten the hackle stems with a pair of flat nose tweezers just in front of the hackle fibers. This will help stop them slipping on the hook shank and remain in the correct position.

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14

Tie the hackles in at the front of the hook.

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15

Now, using a dubbing needle from the rear you can open the fibers of the wing in the correct place for each wrap of ribbing. Make the turns of rib evenly spaced and tight.

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16

Once the whole body is ribbed tie off the tinsel.

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17

Trim off the excess hackle stem ond tinsel. Prepare a hen hackle as shown for the throat.

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18

Tie in the hackle at the base of the wing and wind your tying thread forward behind the hook eye.

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19

Wrap your hen hackle taking care to brush back the fibers with each turn. Tie off.

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20

For this next little trick you will need a small piece of card, I use a backing card that once had braid on it. Fold the card in two and cut a hole in the center, large enough to go over the hook eye.

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21

Whip finish.

Wet your fingers with a little saliva and stroke the hen hackle back from the sides into the required position.

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22 Once your happy with the position of the hackle, place the card as shown over the hook eye and clamp into position. Let this stay like this for a couple of minutes.

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23

Once you remove the card the hackle will be nicely positioned and remain that way.

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24

Varnish the head.

11 responses

  1. Henk

    That really is a most beautifull fly! Wow!!
    I’m so enjoying your site.

    March 12, 2013 at 8:07 pm

    • Thanks Henk, I have been a little busy the last couple of weeks with articles for magazines, but I should be back to regular blogging by the end of the week.
      Cheers
      Barry

      March 13, 2013 at 8:32 am

  2. Reblogged this on Gin Clear and commented:
    Very nice demonstration of The Matuka Streamer. Thanks for the great info, Barry!

    March 12, 2013 at 10:20 pm

    • Thanks, I do like doing these long flies, so there will no doubt be more of them later!

      Cheers

      Barry

      March 13, 2013 at 8:33 am

  3. Pingback: Matuka ! « the limp cobra

  4. Chris Watson

    Beautiful!!!!

    March 18, 2013 at 8:03 pm

  5. Awesome!!!

    March 28, 2013 at 11:07 pm

  6. I like the technique of the card to hold the hackle back and in the correct position. That always is an issue and this technique looks like a simple and effective one…. 🙂 Great looking fly as well.~~~~~~~~
    thanks,
    Brad~~~~<

    May 29, 2013 at 3:16 pm

    • Hi Brad and thanks.

      It is a good technique that works well, but be sure to wet the hackle first beofre you apply the card. To hold the card in place, under a little pressure I use and old English hackle plier.

      Good luck!

      Barry

      May 29, 2013 at 5:15 pm

    • Thanks for the other suggestion… I always wet the hackle but I think a lot of folks don’t like that idea cause it “looks” bad at first…. it’s not the pretty look they are looking for but it’s such a easy way to control them crazy hackles… I was thinking a pair of vice grips for holding the card….. a little overkill I think…. (not really)…. but I like the hackle pliers idea… light weight and easy to use. I’m looking at taking a fountain pen apart and using that over he hook cut in half or less. Put the rear of the pen over the hook and have the hook eye stick out so you can whip finish. I’ve used that before but don’t always have a pen available ….

      Thanks again,
      Brad~~~~~<

      May 29, 2013 at 9:29 pm

  7. Pingback: Robert Frandsen Streamer Collection 2014

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