The aim of this blog is to connect fly-tyers all over the world, to share, techniques, patterns, information and knowledge.

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Hatching mayfly nymph

Sunday’s  pattern to represent the larger burrowing mayfly nymphs when hatching.

Thanks for watching and please remember to subscribe to the feather benders You Tube channel, your help and support in keeping the channel going is greatly appreciated:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYb8DCVlYijoCYgvx_v2EuQ

Tying the bunny bugger

A super simple bugger technique using zonker or cross cut strips that only takes a few minutes to tie.

Thanks for watching and please remember to subscribe to the feather benders You Tube channel, your help and support in keeping the channel going is greatly appreciated:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYb8DCVlYijoCYgvx_v2EuQ

Tying a CdC wasp.

A little black and yellow CdC wasp made with nothing but Cdc and some floss. Semi realistic and floats all day, when the wasps die in late summer early autumn this pattern is a must.

Thanks for watching and please remember to subscribe to the feather benders You Tube channel, your help and support in keeping the channel going is greatly appreciated:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYb8DCVlYijoCYgvx_v2EuQ

Coq de Leon

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These are spade hackles from the roosters of rare breeds of domestic fowl, that originate from the region of Leon in northern Spain.

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Flor De Escoba

The feathers have remarkable colourations and, in the traditional Spanish patterns in which they where used, are not wound onto the hook as a normal hackle.Instead bunches of the fibres are bound onto the hook and then splayed with the tying thread to obtain a radial hackle effect. The speckeled plumage also make excellent tails and caddis wings. The feathers have become more easy to obtain in recent years as their popularity within fly tying has risen. In their finest form the feathers have a stiffness and glasslike translucency that come from birds bread at high altitude on a soil rich in chalk.  The quality of feather is also effected by the time of year they are harvested from the birds. The feathers come in two different types: Indio, these are solid and plain coloured. Pardo are mottled. The trditional names given to the colours are:

INDIO:

nergisco (black) palometas (white) rubion (natural red) palteado (silver grey) acerade (ash grey) avellandado (brownish grey) perla (pearl grey) claro (light grey) oscura (dark grey)

PARDO:

flor de Escoba (dark background with reddish brown spots) sarrioso (light brown background with pale russet brown flecks) corona (fallow deer background with pale russet brown flecks) aconchado (conch shell) langareto (mottled in distinct yellowy lines) encendido (flushed with red) medio (medium shaded and stippled) oscura (dark shade) crudo (immature indistinct mottling .

The hackle fibres make wonderfull mayfly tails…

This is a semi-realistic super hi floating CdC mayfly spinner. Here I show you a tailing technique with Coq de Leon and several special techniques with CdC all you need to do is change the hook size and colour to imitate most mayfly spinners.

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The best quality and selection of colours and sizes is available from Chvron hackles in the UK. Christine that runs Chevron has such a large range that you can spend ages just going through the packets making desition making as difficult as it gets.

http://www.chevronhackles.com

Palomino partridge parachute

 

A midge with a twist. This little dry midge is equiped with a buggy partridge parachute hackle that gives it a spider quality. A great little river pattern.

Thanks for watching and please remember to subscribe to the feather benders You Tube channel, your help and support in keeping the channel going is greatly appreciated:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYb8DCVlYijoCYgvx_v2EuQ

The Imperial Tarpon

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The Imperial

The “herring from hell” as it has affectionally been called or Tarpon as they are commonly known, has over the past 30 years established its self a very special reputation amongst fly fishermen all over the world. Coming myself from the cold north and the home of world class fishing for Atlantic salmon in Norway, fly tyers all over the world have celebrated the Atlantic salmon with hundreds of fully dressed classic salmon fly patterns to pursue the king of fish. As a tribute to the more recent exotic warm water species of game fish I decided to design and develop a series of patterns that I have called “Salt water classics” These are made for fishing but have a more traditional look to them and incorporate classic materials and style of tying.

The Imperial Tarpon has worked extremely well for me in Cuba on both baby and large Tarpon. Like fishing for Atlantic salmon with a self tied fully dressed salmon fly, fishing these salt water classics adds another dimension in the pursuit of the herring from hell.

Hook: Mustad C68 # 5/0 Tarpon
Tying thread: Dyneema
Tail: White, Purple and blue UV2bMarabou
Sides: Two blue edged Vulturine Guinea fowl hackles
Topping: One large Vulturine Guinea fowl hackle
Horns: Two blue dyed Amherst tail fibres
Cheeks: Jungle cock
Hackle: Large natural UV2 Guinea fowl hackle

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1
Secure your Tarpon hook in the vice with the hook shank horizontal.

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2
Attach your tying thread mid shank and cover the back half of the hook shank with a foundation of thread.

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3
I have had great success with UV 2 and fluorescent materials in my salt water patterns. Although there are many who disagree with the effectiveness of UV materials they cost the same and add another edge to the pattern and its only the fish that can see the difference.

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4
Load a Petitjean magic tool with a large fibered marabou hackle.

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5
Transfer the hackle to a Magic clip and cut off the hackle stem with long bladed scissors.

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6
Make a dubbing loop or split your thread if you are using Dyneema and spin the marabou into a dubbing brush.

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7
Wind now the dubbing brush of marabou to form the under tail. Spinning your marabou in a dubbing loop will give the tail much more volume and improve the swimming action.

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8
Now take some UV2 Purple marabou.

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9
Do the same as the white in a dubbing loop and wind this on over the white.

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10
Tie down the base of the marabou tail.

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Now repeat once more with UV2 blue marabou over the purple.

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12
Now you will need some nice blue edged vulturine Guinea fowl hackles. If you are not lucky enough to have a skin you can purchase the hackles in packs of ten in different sizes.

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13
Choose two blue edged hackles of the same size for the sides of the fly. Strip off any down from the lower part of the stem.

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14
Now tie inn one hackle each side of the tail as shown.

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15
These should be balanced on each side of the fly.

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Now select a longer slimmer hackle for the topping.

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This should be approximately one third longer than the side hackles and tied in centre top.

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18
Once again make sure that it is balanced centre and top.

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Once again a UV2 dyed hackle.

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20
Select and prepare a large regular guinea fowl hackle.

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21
Tie in and wind on as a regular wet fly collar.

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22
Select two long Amherst pheasant tail fibre’s for the horns, these are tip dyed blue.

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23
Tie these in one each side in-between the sides and topping.

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24
Select some nice large Jungle cock hackles.

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25
Choose and prepare two large hackles of the same size for the cheeks.

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Secure these horizontal in line with the hook shank one each side over the Vulturine hackles.

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27
Once all is secure you can whip finish and remove your tying thread.

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28
Finish off by giving the head a couple of coats of black varnish and your salt water classic is done.

Partidge caddis emerger

 

A real quick and simple pattern that works wonders under caddis hatches, pulled long and slow just under the surface. Have a great Sunday Friends!

Thanks for watching and please remember to subscribe to the feather benders You Tube channel, your help and support in keeping the channel going is greatly appreciated:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYb8DCVlYijoCYgvx_v2EuQ

Feather Benders past and present part 1

A Little but heart felt tribute to fly tyers of the world who I have crossed paths with and had a friends over the past 30 + years. Who have inspired and carried our craft onward and beyond…

There are hundreds more, that I unfortunately haven’t photographed, if you are a fly tyer and you have a photo of me with you please send me a copy.

I thank you all for your inspiration and dedication.

The Amorous Gammarus.

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Have a love filled weekend fellow feather benders !

Just a Green Highlander

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Have a great Thursday Fishy friends…

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