The Bee’s Knees!

The feather benders home grown and hand crafted fly tyers wax scull’s. It’s not that long ago that pre-waxed tying thread was not readily available, and tyers, especially of the more classic stile patterns resorted to various types of wax to make tying more easy and the natural threads such as cotton and silk more durable. Because the majority of tying threads available today are pre-waxed, the practice of waxing your own tying thread has been somewhat neglected or almost forgotten for most fly tyers. Apart from the obvious advantages as mentioned above, waxing your own thread makes easy work … Continue reading The Bee’s Knees!

How to tie Long Flies-streamer

Blue Devil Custom This is one of the many patterns from the legendary Rangeley fly tyer Carrie G Stevens. Most of her patterns where tied on 6 X long – 10 X long shank hooks although she did use some that where even 12 X long, these super long shank hooks is what gives these flies their unique profile and silhouette. In 1924 Carrie G Stevens caught a 6lb 13oz brook trout on a prototype streamer she had made herself. She entered her catch into the fishing competition in the well known American magazine “Field and Stream” shortly after her … Continue reading How to tie Long Flies-streamer

Making a fur hackle and dubbing tutorial

Once again this is a request I have had from several fellow bloggers for the fur hackle spinning technique. Although similar too the spinning deer hair article, there are a few pointers you should be aware of when mastering this technique. Just about all natural and synthetic furs, feathers and hairs can be used as one form of dubbing or another. Before you start its worth considering what type of hair or material is suitable for the type of fly you are tying. There are several factors regarding the choice of natural materials. 1. Dry fly, nymph, wet flies. 2. … Continue reading Making a fur hackle and dubbing tutorial

Elasticaddis in the house!

House building caddis larva are available in most waters all year round, and are an important segment of the diet of trout and grayling.  There are many techniques that have been developed over the years from fly tying benches all over the world to imitate the house of the caddis larva, but this technique really gives the right impression.  This is a pattern I believe was developed in the US, but other than that I cant find any other information about it.  The great thing about this pattern is if you trim the rubber legs close to the body you … Continue reading Elasticaddis in the house!

Bee Cee Caddis Pupa

Bee Cee Caddis Pupa  video tutorial Hook Mustad  C49S curved caddis # 6 -14 Thread Dyneema Gills Ostrich herl Body Fine leather strip (chamois) Under body Dubbing / Lead free wire if required Legs Partridge hackle & CDC Collar/Head Hares ear dubbing & CDC Dubbing Each summer a few fishing freinds and I make the annual fishing trip from our home town Skien in southern Norway to Lofsdalen in Sweden. A journey that under normal circumstances will take six hours driving, from door to door. Lofsdalen is acctually known for two things, skiing and bears. During the winter, when the … Continue reading Bee Cee Caddis Pupa

Tying the Detatched body mayfly

This is a simple but but effective mayfly pattern that fly tyers of any level can tie with a little practice. Once you have masterd this technique all you have to do is change the size and colour to match most mayfly hatches. The chioce of colours and sizes of fly to be used when tying this pattern is determined by what mayfly you intend to imitate and under what conditions.  In still water fishing, trout can be extremly sellective when feeding on mayflies, they have good time to check them out before sucking them in. Body form: Upholsterers needle … Continue reading Tying the Detatched body mayfly