All in one… a three minute dun mayfly pattern.

To find a simpler dun mayfly imitation  will be difficult.  All you need in the way of materials is one long fibered CdC feather and a short foam cylinder and a hook. I named the fly “All In One” as the whole fly is tied with the same one CdC feather. You need to practice a little if the techniques I us are unfamiliar too you, but with a little practice or after you have tied a half dozen or so, it only takes about two minutes to tie this simple but effective pattern.  All in one floats fantastic as … Continue reading All in one… a three minute dun mayfly pattern.

Tying flies with a gun

Tying with melt glue does require a little more practice and patience than most regular materials. But the results can be rewarding!  Melt glue is a material that one has to get used to using. Once its mastered, it can be put to use not only in developing new patterns but also as a substitute in existing ones. Melt glue guns come in various sizes from hobby to industrial, I find the hobby size not only the cheapest but also the easiest to employ. Another advantage with the hobby gun is the amount of different glue that is available. Although … Continue reading Tying flies with a gun

How to tie Bug Bond Thunder Creek streamer

The original Thunder creek streamer series came from the vice of American, Keith Fulsher. In the early sixties, not satisfied with the regular head and eye size of streamers, he began experimenting and chose the reverse buck tail technique for his Thunder creek patterns.  This technique involves tying the buck tail, as the technique suggests, the opposite way and then folding it back over the hook shank and tying down to form the head. The simplicity of this pattern and the minimal materials needed to tie it, is fly design at its very best! He achieved his goal, a slim … Continue reading How to tie Bug Bond Thunder Creek streamer

How to tie Shrimp for all seasons

From late autumn until early spring the majority of bait fish around our coastline leave the shallows and head out for deeper water where they will be protected from the bitter cold of winter. Many of the species of shrimp that can be found on the other hand move into deeper tidal pools and onto shelves were the coastline is steeper. Therefor shrimps are on the coastal sea trout’s menu the whole year round, and are found in great numbers all over Northern Europe’s coastline.  These are particularly important to fly fishermen because they mature in the shallows where we … Continue reading How to tie Shrimp for all seasons

How to tie E-Z Sand Eel-step by step

Hook Mustad C70SNP-DT Big Game Light # 4-6 Thread Dyneema Body E-Z body tube  Tail 15 strands of Flashabou  Eyes Fleye Foils  Head Bug Bond The original pattern this is based on is form the vice of my late, old friend Jack Gartside. This is not only an extremely effective pattern but also requires the minimum materials and once you have mastered the technique is very quick to tie. Like the most effective coast wobblers that represent Tobis this pattern is a darter, and has next to no movement in the materials, but like a fleeing sand eel it “darts” … Continue reading How to tie E-Z Sand Eel-step by step

European Roe Deer Hair, tools and top tying tips part 1

This is one of my most popular posts, that I made when I first started blogging, but here it is again in three parts, updated with new techniques  and images. Deer hair is normally described as hollow, This doesn´t mean that it´s hollow like a drinking straw, but that each hair is built up of hundreds of small air filled cells. This type of hair structure is most defined in deer from areas with an extreme winter climate. The result, the colder it is, the better the spinning qualities, with some exceptions. The hair from our own reindeer and the … Continue reading European Roe Deer Hair, tools and top tying tips part 1